Sunday, 31 August 2014

UK Music Chart: May 22, 1971

Number 20: Bruce Ruffin

Tony Orlando and his group Dawn continued their residency as the best selling artists on the UK Top 20 this week in May 1971, as Knock Three Times completed its second week as the nation's Number 1 song.



The Chart:
  • 01 (01) Dawn - Knock Three Times 
  • 02 (02) The Rolling Stones - Brown Sugar 
  • 03 (06) R. Dean Taylor - Indiana Wants Me 
  • 04 (04) Ringo Starr - It Don't Come Easy 
  • 05 (03) Dave and Ansel Collins - Double Barrel 
  • 06 (05) Waldo De Los Rios - Mozart Symphony No. 40 
  • 07 (08) East Of Eden - Jig-A-Jig 
  • 08 (14) The Elgins - Heaven Must Have Sent You 
  • 09 (16) McGuinness Flint - Malt and Barley Blues 
  • 10 (07) Diana Ross - Remember Me 
  • 11 (20) Free - My Brother Jake 
  • 12 (11) Séverine - Un Banc, Un Arbre, Une Rue 
  • 13 (17) Gerry Monroe - It's A Sin To Tell A Lie 
  • 14 (12) Sakkarin - Sugar, Sugar 
  • 15 (10) Andy Williams - (Where Do I Begin) Love Story 
  • 16 (24) The Arsenal First Team Squad - Good Old Arsenal 
  • 17 (09) T. Rex - Hot Love 
  • 18 (28) Neil Diamond - I Am...I Said 
  • 19 (19) Georgie Fame and Alan Price - Rosetta 
  • 20 (27) Bruce Ruffin - Rain
*Previous week in brackets; Climbers denoted in red; New entries in bold 
Image: Mad About You - The Anthology: Bruce Ruffin

16: The Arsenal First Team Squad: Good Old Arsenal

With the Arsenal football club completing the double of League Champions and FA Cup winners in the 1970/71 season, it seemed only natural that the team should go into the studio and record its version of Rule Britannia. Fans duly bought Good Old Arsenal and propelled it to a peak of Number 16 this week.


18: Neil Diamond: I Am...I Said

Making a steady climb into the Top 20 this week was what was about to be Neil Diamond's third consecutive UK Top 10 hit, the very personal I Am...I Said. As stated by AllMusic, it's "an impassioned statement of emotional turmoil, the song [was] very much in tune with the confessional singer/songwriter movement of the time..." Having already peaked at Number 4 in the States just weeks earlier, the track would go on to repeat that peak position in the UK.


20: Bruce Ruffin: Rain

Bruce Ruffin's Rain was the first of a brace of hits for the London-based Jamaican reggae singer. Originally written and recorded by José Feliciano in the late 1960s, Ruffin added a rocksteady beat to the song and saw the track scrape into the Top 20, eventually settling at a high of Number 19. Ruffin would return to the British charts a year later with his second and final hit, Mad About You.



The American Top 10 (May 22, 1971)
  • 01 (01) Joy to the World - Three Dog Night 
  • 02 (02) Never Can Say Goodbye - The Jackson Five 
  • 03 (06) Brown Sugar - The Rolling Stones 
  • 04 (03) Put Your Hand in the Hand - Ocean 
  • 05 (05) Me and You and a Dog Named Boo - Lobo 
  • 06 (12) Want Ads - Honey Cone 
  • 07 (07) Bridge Over Troubled Water - Aretha Franklin 
  • 08 (13) It Don't Come Easy - Ringo Starr 
  • 09 (04) If - Bread 
  • 10 (10) Chick-A-Boom - Daddy Dewdrop

The Number 1 album this week:
Sticky Fingers - The Rolling Stones



Saturday, 30 August 2014

UK Music Chart: May 15, 1971

Number 11: Séverine

Dawn's Knock Three Times repeated its American feat by climbing to Number 1 in the UK this week in May 1971 for its first of five weeks as the nation's best selling single.



Elsewhere in the Top 20, two of last week's new entries were making the best headway with both East of Eden's Jig-A-Jig and Sakkarin's Sugar Sugar climbing seven places from their previous positions.

However, the track that was making the biggest impression in the chart was the winner of the 1971 Eurovision Song Contest, as Un Banc, Un Arbre, Une Rue by Séverine motored up the listing.

The Chart:
  • 01 (02) Dawn - Knock Three Times 
  • 02 (03) The Rolling Stones - Brown Sugar 
  • 03 (01) Dave and Ansel Collins - Double Barrel 
  • 04 (04) Ringo Starr - It Don't Come Easy 
  • 05 (05) Waldo De Los Rios - Mozart Symphony No. 40 
  • 06 (12) R. Dean Taylor - Indiana Wants Me 
  • 07 (07) Diana Ross - Remember Me 
  • 08 (15) East Of Eden - Jig-A-Jig 
  • 09 (06) T. Rex - Hot Love 
  • 10 (08) Andy Williams - (Where Do I Begin?) Love Story 
  • 11 (28) Séverine - Un Banc, Un Arbre, Une Rue 
  • 12 (19) Sakkarin - Sugar, Sugar 
  • 13 (13) The Sweet - Funny, Funny 
  • 14 (25) The Elgins - Heaven Must Have Sent You 
  • 15 (20) Marmalade - My Little One 
  • 16 (23) McGuinness Flint - Malt and Barley Blues 
  • 17 (18) Gerry Monroe - It's A Sin To Tell A Lie 
  • 18 (10) Ray Stevens - Bridget the Midget 
  • 19 (11) Georgie Fame and Alan Price - Rosetta 
  • 20 (24) Free - My Brother Jake
*Previous week in brackets; Climbers denoted in red; New entries in bold

11: Séverine: Un banc, un arbre, une rue

Hot on the heels of her win at the 1971 Eurovision Song Contest, French singer Séverine leapt seventeen places into the Top 20 with Un banc, un arbre, une rue (A Bench, A Tree, A Road). The song represented Monaco and it was the first and only time that the principality would win the competition. Quite possibly one of the best of the classic winners, it was nevertheless unusual for the original foreign language version from Eurovision to score the hit in the UK. There was an English version released called Chance in Time, but it failed to enjoy any success.

 

14: The Elgins: Heaven Must Have Sent You

Another re-release from the Motown back catalogue to chart in the UK on the back of the Northern Soul phenomenon was this 1966 song by The Elgins. Heaven Must Have Sent You failed to chart in the UK on its original outing five years earlier, although it did see some action on both the US Pop and Soul charts. It would eventually peak at Number 3 on this 1971 release, prompting another re-release follow-up with Put Yourself in My Place.


16: McGuiness Flint: Malt and Barley Blues

The band's second Top 5 UK hit in the matter of six months entered the Top 20 at this week's Number 16. It would prove to be McGuiness Flint's final foray into the charts as two key members, Gallagher and Lyle, left to record as a duo at the end of the year. Unlike their first hit, When I'm Dead and Gone, which managed a US Billboard Top 50 placing, Malt and Barley Blues failed to impress Stateside.


20: Free: My Brother Jake

English blues rock band Free made a welcome return to the UK charts in May 1971 with My Brother Jake, the follow-up to the massively successful All Right Now. It was something of a surprise as the band was now in turmoil following the relative commercial failure of their fourth album, Highway. Not originally included on that album, much later releases featured it among the bonus tracks. It would eventually peak at Number 4.

 

The American Top 10 (May 15, 1971)
  • 01 (01) Joy to the World - Three Dog Night 
  • 02 (02) Never Can Say Goodbye - The Jackson Five 
  • 03 (03) Put Your Hand in the Hand - Ocean 
  • 04 (05) If - Bread 
  • 05 (10) Me and You and a Dog Named Boo - Lobo 
  • 06 (13) Brown Sugar - The Rolling Stones 
  • 07 (08) Bridge Over Troubled Water - Aretha Franklin 
  • 08 (07) Stay Awhile - The Bells 
  • 09 (04) I Am...I Said - Neil Diamond 
  • 10 (09) Chick-A-Boom - Daddy Dewdrop

The Number 1 album this week:
Sticky Fingers - The Rolling Stones