Monday, 1 July 2013

UK Music Chart: April 11, 1970

Number 10 : The Pipkins : Gimme Dat Ding
  •  01 (01) Simon And Garfunkel - Bridge Over Troubled Water 
  •  02 (13) Dana - All Kinds Of Everything 
  •  03 (03) Andy Williams - Can't Help Falling In Love 
  •  04 (02) Mary Hopkin - Knock, Knock Who's There 
  •  05 (04) Lee Marvin - Wand'rin' Star 
  •  06 (15) Norman Greenbaum - Spirit In The Sky 
  •  07 (06) Pickettywitch - That Same Old Feeling 
  •  08 (05) Bob And Marcia - Young, Gifted And Black 
  •  09 (08) Kenny Rogers And The First Edition - Something's Burning 
  •  10 (21) Pipkins - Gimme Dat Ding! 
  •  11 (07) Beatles - Let It Be 
  •  12 (17) Four Tops - I Can't Help Myself 
  •  13 (14) Jimmy Ruffin - Farewell Is A Lonely Sound 
  •  14 (10) Elvis Presley - Don't Cry Daddy 
  •  15 (09) Dave Clark Five - Everybody Get Together 
  •  16 (22) Cuff-Links - When Julie Comes Around 
  •  17 (18) Joe Dolan - You're Such A Good Looking Woman 
  •  18 (11) Steam - Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye 
  •  19 (39) Stevie Wonder - Never Had A Dream Come True 
  •  20 (12) Jackson Five - I Want You Back
*Previous week in brackets; Climbers denoted in red
Image: Pipkins - Gimme Dat Ding download

Bridge Over Troubled Water was about to complete its third and final week as the UK's best seller, as two other tracks on this week's listing were charging up the charts to eventually make claim to the Number 1 position: All Kinds of Everything and Spirit in the Sky. Elsewhere, three songs were new to the Top 20.

The first of these was very much a novelty song, sung by a studio duo, that also became a huge hit in the USA. The Pipkins were session singer Tony Burrows and songwriter Roger Greenaway. Both had been involved with other studio groups from recent weeks, including Edison Lighthouse, White Plains and Brotherhood of Man. Research shows that Gimme Dat Ding was originally recorded by Freddie and the Dreamers for a children's TV show sequence and later released on the album Oliver in the Overworld:

 

The new entry at Number 16 was the follow-up to the recent Top 10 success, Tracy by The Cuff Links. Although the group would continue to release singles over the next couple of years, When Julie Comes Around would prove to be their last chart entry in the UK:



Stevie Wonder's first single release of the 1970s is one of my favourites amongst his very large catalogue of songs. In fact, much of his output throughout this decade I could listen to over and over again. Never Had A Dream Come True is possibly not one of his best remembered tracks, but it did turn out to be more successful in the UK than in his homeland. It peaked at Number 5 here, while the States could only lift him to  Number 26:



Until next time...